Jewish Recipes/ Side Dishes/ Vegetables

Roasted Carrot, Sweet Potato and Fig Tzimmes

Fig and Carrot Tzimmes
 
This untraditional tzimmes is simply made with carrots, sweet potatoes and parsnips. Add in some dried figs or raisins and you have a side dish that is perfect for any occasion.

Carrot and Sweet Potato Tzimmes

A tzimes, (tzimmes) is a Jewish side dish that comes in many versions.

Traditionally a tzimmes is a stew and made in a Dutch oven. It almost always contains a variety of root vegetables and usually prunes or raisins. 

Honey was often mixed in too, which made this a common side dish for Rosh Hashanah, though it is perfect for Passover, too.

My mother always added a chunk of brisket to hers though, I prefer mine vegetarian style. I also prefer this roasted version, over a more typical stew.

Tzimmes which Google likes to spell tzimes, besides having the sweetness of fruit also usually has cinnamon added. 

Tzimmes tzimes

This modern version of tzimes is a bit more on the savory side though it does get added sweetness from the figs, orange juice and molasses. Just a bit of molasses gives this a simple hearty flavor.

This roasted carrot and parsnip tzimmes (tzimes) recipe also has garlic and onion which is not common in most recipes.

Now let’s state the facts. As a child, and even as an adult I hated tzimmes.

Now many of you probably don’t know what a tzimmes is, but my mom kvelled over tzimmes. She loved the stuff, but me, not so much.

Not being a lover of stew, tzimmes (tzimes) just wasn’t my childhood dream. 

Tzimmes tzimes

Every holiday everyone always fussed over Mom’s tzimmes, especially my father.

My father loved the leftovers! A big fuss was always made over how good it was. And yeah, that’s exactly what tzimmes means; a fuss. 

So if someone ever says to you, “Don’t make a tzimmes over it.” They are telling you not to fuss over something. Yes, I do love this word!

Last year for Passover I made this tzimmes.  Supposedly it was a real tzimmes to make because of all that went into it, which is all the more reason for me to avoid making it. Well, that is until I found this recipe.

I do love tradition and it was with great expectations that I made this. Though my parents did not consider it tzimmes, I loved this new modern version!

Tzimmes tzimes

Tzimmes  (Tzimes) Substitutions

Sweet potatoes and carrots are traditional, but white potatoes are often used too.

Any root vegetables will work as long as they roast in about the same time. Make sure to cut them about the same size so this happens. 

Like rutabagas and turnips? Feel free to sub in. 

Don’t like figs?

Add in some prunes or raisins or dried apricots. This dish is not to be fussed over!

Carrots roasting on sheet pan

Root veggies are some of my favorites. Filled with sweet potatoes and parsnips and figs, I also think this would make a snazzy Thanksgiving side. And you don’t have to make a tzimmes over it!

The original recipe that I spied-and I can’t remember what book it came from…had za’atar in it.

Well, you know how much I adore za’atar, but being Passover and all, and knowing that my dad is not big on too many seasonings, I switched it up a bit to make it more traditional-well-in an untraditional sense.

No this isn’t a stew. It is easy to make. It is pretty. It tastes good. It can be served at room temperature, which means it can give you extra oven space, which is BIG for Thanksgiving. And last, but not least, it isn’t a tzimmes to make!

This roasted version of tzimmes is easy to make and though it does not have the texture of stew, it is worthy on its own. Healthy and tasty, this is one version I can make a tzimmes over!

Roasted Carrots and Figs

Need Some More:

Hazelnut Roasted Carrots

Roasted Carrots with Za'atar

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Carrot and Fig Tzimmes

 
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Tzimmes

Roasted Carrot, Sweet Potato and Fig Tzimmes

  • Author: Abbe Odenwalder
  • Prep Time: 15 Minutes
  • Cook Time: 35-40 Minutes
  • Total Time: 60 Minutes
  • Yield: 4 - 8 Servings 1x
  • Category: Side Dish
  • Method: Oven
  • Cuisine: Jewish

Description

This modern version of carrot tzimmes is roasted, simple to make and totally delish!


Ingredients

Scale

8 dried figs or 3/4 c golden raisins
1/4 c orange juice
3/4 lb carrots, peeled and cut into 1″ sticks
3/4 lb sweet potatoes peeled and cut into 1″ sticks
1/2 lb parsnips, peeled and cut into 1″ sticks
3 garlic cloves, sliced thin
1 onion, sliced in thin wedges
1 T chicken fat schmaltz or olive oil
2 T olive oil
1 T molasses
1 T balsamic vinegar
3 bay leaves, split in half
Salt and Pepper


Instructions

Combine figs with orange juice and let soak for 20 minutes to 1 hour. Drain and reserve the juice.

Preheat oven to 425. Line a large baking sheet with parchment.

In a large bowl, combine the figs or raisins, carrots, sweet potatoes and parsnips, garlic and onion.

Add the olive oil or schmaltz, vinegar and molasses, bay leaves and salt and pepper to taste. Make sure mixture is coated well and spread out on the baking sheet. Try not to crowd or the vegiges may steam and not roast. (You want this to roast so the veggies get caramelized and not stewed!)

After about 30-40 minutes when the veggies are cooked, sprinkle with the reserved orange juice and toss again. Taste for seasoning and serve warm or at room temperature.


Notes

You can change out the seasonings. Feel free to add za’atar, orange zest, baharat, cinnamon or whatever else you like!

Keywords: tzimes, recipe for tzimmes, roasted carrots and parsnips, roasted carrots, oven roasted carrots

 

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  • Dawn Yucuis
    November 12, 2016 at 9:33 pm

    Although I have never eaten tzimmes, I am sure that I would love this. Roasting vegetables always make them taste wonderful.

    • Abbe Odenwalder
      November 14, 2016 at 3:56 am

      This sure isn't my mother's tzimmes, but I think it is better!

  • Mary
    November 11, 2016 at 7:59 pm

    Delicious! this is a wonderful recipe, I love it!

    • Abbe Odenwalder
      November 14, 2016 at 3:55 am

      Thanks MAry! Glad you are enjoying!

  • Adam J. Holland
    November 11, 2016 at 12:15 pm

    I'm glad you made a tzimmes over this post. 😉 Looks outstanding!

  • Liz Berg
    November 11, 2016 at 10:47 am

    I've never tasted tzimmes, but I'd never hesitate to dive into your gorgeous version!

    • Abbe Odenwalder
      November 14, 2016 at 3:54 am

      Thanks Liz! They were delicious but the tzimmes I had as a kid sure wasn't like this!

  • Yi @ YiReservation
    November 10, 2016 at 7:28 pm

    This is my first time hearing about tzimmes but for some reason it reminded me a roasted brisket a Jewish friend of mine makes during holiday season. She puts a lot of carrots and parsnips and the sauce was slightly sweet. Your recipe sounds wonderful and full of flavor. Thanks for sharing!

  • Cheri Savory Spoon
    November 10, 2016 at 4:57 pm

    Hi Abbe, oh this does sound delicious, love that you added molasses. Za' atar is one of my favorite spices as well. I'm ready for the week-end.

  • Karen Harris
    November 10, 2016 at 2:35 pm

    I don't know if I would have appreciated this dish as a kid, but I sure would now! This looks delicious.

  • Angie Schneider
    November 10, 2016 at 10:23 am

    Roasting is definitely the best way to make veggies, esp. the root veggies. This looks particularly great with dried figs.

  • Abbe Odenwalder
    November 10, 2016 at 3:46 am

    Well, you might have to get yourself invited to a Jewish holiday dinner! Don't think you will find tzimmes too many places!

  • Kitchen Riffs
    November 10, 2016 at 1:38 am

    I've never had this dish. Nor heard of it. I don't get out much! But it looks terrific. Thanks!

  • La Table De Nana
    November 10, 2016 at 1:17 am

    Must be delicious!

    • Abbe Odenwalder
      November 10, 2016 at 3:47 am

      I think all roasted veggies are, don't you?